Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://hdl.handle.net/2440/124136
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Type: Journal article
Title: Omega-3 fatty acid supplementation in pregnancy - baseline omega-3 status and early preterm birth: exploratory analysis of a randomised controlled trial
Author: Simmonds, L.A.
Sullivan, T.R.
Skubisz, M.
Middleton, P.F.
Best, K.P.
Yelland, L.N.
Quinlivan, J.
Zhou, S.J.
Liu, G.
McPhee, A.J.
Gibson, R.A.
Makrides, M.
Citation: BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, 2020; 127(8):975-981
Publisher: Wiley
Issue Date: 2020
ISSN: 1470-0328
1471-0528
Statement of
Responsibility: 
LA Simmonds, TR Sullivan, M Skubisz, PF Middleton, KP Best ... et al.
Abstract: OBJECTIVE: To identify a polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) biomarker able to detect which women with singleton pregnancies are most likely to benefit from omega-3 supplementation to reduce their risk of early preterm birth. DESIGN: Exploratory analysis of a randomised controlled trial. SETTING: Six Australian hospitals. POPULATION: Women with a singleton pregnancy enrolled in the ORIP trial. METHODS: Using maternal capillary whole blood collected ~14 weeks' gestation, the fatty acids in total blood lipids were quantified using gas chromatography. Interaction tests examined whether baseline PUFA status modified the effect of omega-3 supplementation on birth outcomes. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Early preterm birth (<34 weeks' gestation). RESULTS: A low total omega-3 PUFA status in early pregnancy was associated with a higher risk of early preterm birth. Among women with a total omega-3 status ≤4.1% of total fatty acids, omega-3 supplementation substantially reduced the risk of early preterm birth compared with control (0.73% vs. 3.16%; relative risk=0.23, 95% CI 0.07-0.79). Conversely, women with higher total omega-3 status in early pregnancy were at lower risk of early preterm birth. Supplementing women with a baseline status above 4.9% increased early preterm birth (2.20% vs. 0.97%; relative risk=2.27, 95% CI 1.13-4.58). CONCLUSIONS: Women with singleton pregnancies and low total omega-3 PUFA status early in pregnancy have an increased risk of early preterm birth and are most likely to benefit from omega-3 supplementation to reduce this risk. Women with higher total omega-3 status are at lower risk and additional omega-3 supplementation may increase their risk.
Keywords: Omega-3 fatty acids; biomarker; docosahexaenoic acid; preterm birth
Description: First published:08 February 2020
Rights: © 2020 Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynaecologists
RMID: 1000014000
DOI: 10.1111/1471-0528.16168
Grant ID: http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1050468
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1052388
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1046207
http://purl.org/au-research/grants/nhmrc/1061704
Appears in Collections:Medicine publications

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